Maine Roots

A blog about all things Maine


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Family Recipe: Cherry Tomato Pasta

This recipe is a Shevenell original, and I’m honored / excited / proud to share it.  My brother, Ed, is the creative mastermind behind this flavorful blend of veggies, olive oil, butter, and wine, which can be served over pasta or a “noodle” like spaghetti squash or spiralized zucchini.  This meal is delicious and good for you – especially if you go the 100% veggie route.

Mom and I whipped this up during her visit to Georgia, and it will become a regular in my cooking rotation (get ready, Nick).  Ed has a knack for coming up with new recipes and unexpected flavor profiles that taste spectacular, and this is no exception.

Serves 2-4
You’ll need:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1-2 cups cherry tomatoes, washed and whole
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Balsamic vinegar (1-2 tablespoons, your preference)
  • Worcestershire sauce (just a drizzle)
  • 1-2 cups white or red wine, or chicken stock (or a combination;quantity depends on your preference)
  • Noodles of your choice (or spaghetti squash or spiralized zucchini)

Heat the olive oil and butter over medium high heat, then add the onions and saute until tender.  Add the cherry tomatoes, garlic, balsamic vinegar, and Worcestershire sauce, continuing to cook over medium high heat until the tomatoes blister, burst, and start becoming tender.  At this point, add your wine and/or chicken stock and allow ingredients to simmer.

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We made our sauce with a blend of white wine and chicken stock, approximately 1 1/2 cups total, and it was excellent – the rich qualities of the broth and the acidity of the wine created a nice blend to complement the other flavors.

Allow the mixture to simmer while the wine reduces, approximately 10 minutes, then add your noodles, squash, or spiralized zucchini.  Continue to simmer for a few minutes, or until squash or zucchini is soft.  Ed likes to go with zucchini for the nutty flavor it introduces.

You can also easily incorporate meat in this recipe, just vary when you add it depending on cooking requirements.  To keep it easy, Mom and I went with cooked Italian chicken sausage, which also made this a heartier dinner.  Other good additions would be: cooked chicken, shrimp, or a flaky white fish.  For even more nutrient value, you can toss in some leafy greens like spinach or kale.

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Recognize the shape of that cutting board? #ME

This is one of those recipes I love because you can stray from it a little bit or vary it to work with the ingredients you have, and it will still deliver delicious results.

Ready to serve!

Ready to serve!

I hope you try it – and enjoy!


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What’s In a NaME?

Your name is so much more than just what people call you – it becomes definitive of all the characteristics (good and bad) people associate with you – your “personal brand,” as some of my marketing colleagues would say. This is no less true in business. Think about a brand you love. I’ll go with Asics, for purposes of this example. I will never buy a running shoe brand other than Asics. I love them. I get excited when my fellow runners ask me what shoes I recommend – because I get to talk about Asics. To me, Asics is synonymous with quality, dependability, technology, and a passionate commitment to health and fitness. Every business hopes their customers become what I’ve become for Asics: a brand ambassador. So how do you do it?

If you’re a business owner in Maine, chances are you’ve thought about your brand even if you’re not familiar with the term itself. If you’ve spent time thinking about your name, your logo, your colors, your business purpose, and the experience and service your customers receive, you’ve thought about your brand. The fact that you chose to start a business in Maine already weaves itself into your brand – people will associate attributes of the state and its resident Mainiacs with your business. Maine is respected as a state with an independent and entrepreneurial spirit, where small businesses comprise 97% of the state’s employers. Born and raised there, I’ve always been deeply proud of the reputation Maine has for quality and sincerity – from its people to its products.

When I first began writing Maine Roots, I was largely inspired by exactly this – the entrepreneurial spirit of Maine’s people. Having moved south for college and my career, I was searching for a way to reconnect and perhaps contribute in some small way to their success. The people of Maine are hard-working, compassionate, and proud, and I in turn was proud to write about them as I made my home far away. And just recently, when I was approached by Domain.ME to write a post sharing their unique value proposition for people and businesses from Maine, doing so seemed to be a natural fit.

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.ME is the provider of URLs that end in .ME. It’s unique and unexpected, just like so much of the state of Maine. As an experienced marketing and communications professional, I saw an immediate connection with these shared traits that goes deeper than just the match with the state abbreviation – which is still pretty neat – and moves into branding territory. Your brand is critically important to your business, as is how you communicate it. In one blog post, I can hardly cover more than the tip of the iceberg about brand, but I’m excited to share one easy-to-implement way to reinforce it for ME businesses – with a URL ending in .ME. This is a clever communications tool that naturally plays to both your location and the very idea of the singularity of the state of Maine.

In case you aren’t familiar with the term “brand,” here’s an explanation of how brand is generally defined by professional marketers: some combination of a) how your customers and potential customers perceive you (i.e. Volvo = safety), b) your name, your logo, the colors and fonts and style that comprise your visual identity, and c) customer experience from service, to communication, to accessibility.

Maine businesses have the good fortune of being branded with a reputation for quality service and products and the expectation of unique, vibrant personality – simply by virtue of their location. This established reputation is the gift of generations of Mainers to business owners in the state today. How you define your brand on top of that strong foundation is up to you! For a few pointers on effective brand strategy, I liked this post from Hanson Dodge Creative (or feel free to email me and we can discuss further).

Once you’ve defined your brand and brand strategy, how will you communicate it (beyond the experience you deliver to your customers every day, which isn’t to be discounted)? For small business, particularly in a state like Maine where tourism is such a significant part of the economy, having a strong online presence is an important piece of your communications strategy. This is another area with a myriad of topics to cover (mobile-friendly, SEO, social media, best practices etc. etc.), but in the interest of time, let’s simply acknowledge that being online enables potential customers to find you.

If I was running a small business in Maine, working to build my brand, and either considering an online presence or questioning if it’s effective enough, I would seize the opportunity to work with .ME. Why? .ME behaves as a natural brand reinforcement tool for any Maine-based business, even if it isn’t technically the official domain of Maine. And we’ve discussed the significance of brand ad nauseam. In case you’re wondering, .ME offers all the same SEO (search engine optimization) benefits any other type of URL (.com, .org, etc.), so the question for a Maine business truly becomes: why wouldn’t you work with .ME?

This post was inspired and sponsored by Domain.ME, the provider of the personal domains that end in .ME. As a company, they aim to promote thought leadership to the tech world. All thoughts and opinions are my own.


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Recipe: Mom’s Best Brisket

Alright, faithful readers.  I’m back with a not-so-weekly recipe, but it’s guaranteed to be a crowd-pleaser.

I was a bit shocked when I realized how much time had passed since my last recipe post, but then I remembered: for the last four months, I’ve been experimenting with gluten-free and dairy-free diets in the (ultimately futile) hope they would minimize or eliminate my migraines.  No such luck, but through that process I discovered how many of my Maine cookbook recipes heavily feature dairy (because let’s be honest, it’s delicious).  I was also pleasantly surprised to discover that aside from difficulty at restaurants, eliminating gluten and dairy really wasn’t that hard, and I didn’t miss it that much.  Now that I’m back to an unrestricted diet, it’s time to get back to regular recipe shares.

Mom’s Best Brisket comes from my all-time favorite Maine cookbook, Recipes from the Maine Kitchen.  It fits my low-maintenance cooking and entertaining requirements: brief ingredient list, relatively straightforward, and delicious results.  I made this on Saturday while we were entertaining a few friends and watching college football (Go Tigers!), and it was a hit.  For the best flavor, you should really make it the day before…. but I ran out of time.

Recipe serves 10 (also halves well)
You’ll need:

  • 6 lb. single brisket or 2 smaller cuts
  • 2 large onions, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • Oil or spray for browning meat

Brown the brisket on all sides in a heavy skillet or large Dutch oven.  Remove brisket and put on a platter, then brown the onions and garlic.  Add the remaining ingredients and place the brisket back in the pot.

You can either cook the brisket on the stove top over a low flame for 2 to 3 hours, covered, or put it in the oven, covered, at 325 degrees for the same amount of time.

At 2 hours, check the meat – if it is tender but not falling apart, remove the brisket and place on a large cutting board.  Slice the meat across the grain in 1/2 to 3/4 inch slices, return to the pot, cover and continue cooking for a half hour to an hour.  This step is messy but is worth it!  The flavors really seep into the meat this way.

I served the brisket with a salad and garlic couscous, but mashed potatoes would also be an excellent side.

Happy cooking!