Maine Roots

A blog about all things Maine


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Harvest On The Harbor – Starts Tomorrow!

How did the middle of October get here so quickly?  That seems to be the theme of the year for me – it has simply flown by and I find it hard to believe we’re well into fall, harvest, and foliage season.

With this time of year comes Maine’s premier food and wine festival, Harvest on the Harbor.  Beginning tomorrow, October 21st, and running through Sunday, October 25th, this festival brings together exceptional talent from food and drink to entertainment.  The events are not cheap, but they sound incredible.  You can review the schedule at-a-glance here and buy tickets here.  A few that appeal to me the most:

Vines to Wines – Oct 23rd, 5:30pm – 7pm at Custom Home

Maine Marketplace – Taste the 8 Regions of Maine – two times, Oct 24th from 12pm – 2:30pm and 4pm – 6:30pm at The Portland Company

Harvest Hop Beer & Whiskey Crawl – Oct 24th, 7pm – 9pm – East Bayside

Get out and enjoy all the city and the state has to offer!


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Wine in Maine: Cellardoor Winery

My third and final installment in the Wine in Maine series is here!

When people think of wine in Maine (anyone who’s flipped open a Maine-based magazine, at least), it’s highly likely that Cellardoor is the first thing to come to mind. Glossy advertising will do that, especially without much noteworthy competition in the state.  Having now visited Cellardoor in person, it is easy to see the appeal of this winery – it combines a picturesque view with quality wine and an atmosphere that, at least on the surface, is representative of the great state of Maine with rustic touches, coastal elements, and a general sense of welcome.

Tasting Room Bar Area

Tasting Room Bar Area (restored, 200-year-old barn)

On the day of our visit, as we wound our way from Union to Lincolnville, I was filled with anticipation to see the business that has been clearly established as the preeminent Maine winery and wine destination, down to their very website URL, mainewine.com.  In many ways, I was not disappointed.  The visual experience both indoor and out at Cellardoor is stunning – a beautiful facility with a smart and attractive selection of merchandise, combined with a sweeping view.  I struggled with writing my review of this winery because I recognize how many of my readers, and consumers in general, may love the Cellardoor experience.  I simply didn’t – something was missing for me.

I struggled even more, having read the Cellardoor website and chatted with the staff, because it is clear to me that the business owner, Bettina Doulton, is deeply committed to sharing her love of Maine and has played a leadership role in advancing and promoting the Maine wine industry, founding the Maine Wine Guild and its statewide Maine Wine Trail.  Undeniably, these contributions are heartfelt, genuine, and critically important to the state’s wine tourism industry.  I admire her mission, what she has accomplished, and the business she’s built.

So what was missing for me?  It’s hard to put my finger on.  It is some intangible combination of the people, the wine, and the atmosphere that gives those businesses that capture it a very special quality and deeply resonates with their customers.  It feels natural and unrehearsed.  I love those special Maine businesses that feel deeply authentic even to the point of imperfection.  Cellardoor was stunning – so stunning and manicured it struck me as somehow more suited to Cape Cod or Martha’s Vineyard than Lincolnville, Maine.  I was reminded of how I felt during my college tour on the Furman University campus – rather like a bull in a china shop, as they say – certain I would break something in all of that pristine beauty.  So, candidly, it could be just me.  I am confident the vast majority of patrons enjoy every moment at Cellardoor and reminisce about their experience with family and friends. And while I am charmed by the meaningful history behind the Cellardoor logo, I simply found Cellardoor to be somewhat… remote.  It was beautiful.  The wine was good.  Our server was friendly and personable.  It just didn’t feel like the small businesses Maine is known and loved for, where the owners are omni-present, the employees are more ambassadors than mere workers, and the appearance and experience may not be flawless, but it is human and warm.

Having said that, I do want to share what I did enjoy.  First, I was really impressed by the merchandise Cellardoor chooses to stock – it is a classy and appealing mix of glasswork, art, pottery, books, and wine and kitchen gizmos. Where some wineries dip dangerously close to chintzy, cheesy gift items, Cellardoor has  a selection that would have me stopping by just to shop for something beautiful and unique.  Second, the wine was certainly well-crafted, and made from grapes grown across the country as well as Maine, which enables Cellardoor to offer varietals that more people are familiar with (such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Syrah, among others).  This is a smart business move and, very likely, enables the owner and winemaker to craft wines they themselves already love.  I particularly enjoyed ‘Ned Said Red,’ a blend of Cabernet Franc and Merlot with a naming back story.

The facility includes a restored barn and farmhouse (the tasting room is located in the restored barn), as well as a state-of-the-art winery across the road.  It has been beautifully redone with high quality finishes, and in combination with the view, would be an incredible and romantic setting for a wedding or other type of event.

If I visit again, my advice to myself is to appreciate Cellardoor for what it is, grab a glass of wine and a seat on the porch, and soak in the beauty of Maine.

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Wine in Maine: Sweetgrass Farm Winery and Distillery

When I think about our visit to Sweetgrass Farm Winery & Distillery, the image that instantly pops into my mind is that first moment, as we pulled into the gravel driveway and had our first glimpse of a sweeping view of field, forest, and mountains.  The driveway itself is edged closely by both the road and the winery, as so many other old farms now are – pressed up against our modern roads.

The view at Sweetgrass

The view at Sweetgrass

The winery structure is charmingly, classically Maine.  A pretty, shingled building that has been updated to combine traditional elements with other, more modern influences like the wraparound deck and railing.  I found this combination of styles to be a theme throughout Sweetgrass – and it’s been executed so seamlessly that it enhances the experience without feeling too “perfect” or “untouchable.”  Inside and out, from the restored old truck and the gleaming copper Alembic still to the classic, white Adirondack chairs on the lawn, Sweetgrass hit all the right notes. “Sweet” indeed.

One of the most appealing aspects of Sweetgrass for me personally was how integral Maine traditions and products clearly are to the business.  I even feel the combination of the historic and the modern design elements and decor reflect this – generally speaking, Mainers hold on to a deep respect for the way things have been done for generations, while still moving forward themselves.  For example, in addition to operating as a winery and distillery, Sweetgrass is still a working farm.  They raise and sell Friesian and Friesian cross sheep for both meat and fleece; they have laying chickens and meat chickens; turkeys; pigs; and two cats.  They grow some of the fruit they use in their wines and liquors, and buy the vast majority of the remainder from other Maine resources, and they also grow grass (hay) for feed.  Sweetgrass sums up everything I felt about the experience there on their website, when asked about their philosophy: “to be a family run business preserving Union’s rich farming tradition, firmly rooted in the community, supporting local sustainable agriculture, local business, and donating 10% of profits to organizations which support families, children, and rural life.”

Philosophy and setting aside, the wines and liquors we had the opportunity to taste were exceptional on their own.  While my favorite, by a large margin, was their apple wine – delightful and crisp and pairs beautifully with lobster – I also enjoyed the sparkling cranberry apple (after all, what could be more holiday-appropriate than this flavorful, bubbly treat?) as well as the rhubarb smash.  Nick particularly enjoyed their renowned Back River Gin, which ended up being one of three bottles we purchased and brought home with us.  During our tasting, we had the opportunity to chat a bit with one of the owners about the business and what they’ve strived to accomplish.  I walked away understanding that vision, experience, and commitment have been critical to their success, which now includes an Old Port location and many accolades and awards, in addition to the Farm itself.

From beginning to end, this is a must-visit Maine winery. It was just our second of three winery stops during our cross-Maine trek from Crescent Lake to very nearly the Camden area, and it is the one I would most like to visit again.  Next time, though, I’d pack a picnic lunch, plan to stay a while, and indulge my wish to sit in one of those Adirondack chairs, soak in the view, and sip a Sweetgrass wine.

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That’s how I recommend you experience it!


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Wine in Maine: Savage Oakes Vineyard and Winery

I’ve struggled to write this blog post with each attempt – multiple attempts made over multiple months – and I don’t know why.  Here, today, I’m forging ahead and doing my best to introduce you all to Savage Oakes Vineyard & Winery, a truly unique winery experience that can be found in Union, Maine.

Perhaps my struggle to find the right words is borne of the very nature of Savage Oakes.  At its core, this is a family farm that represents the proud history of local farming and continues to raise pork, beef, and chicken today.  But beyond the core, necessity has driven Savage Oakes’ owners to find additional revenue opportunities, a situation many local farmers can relate to.  Savage Oakes Vineyard & Winery is the ingenuity borne from necessity – a new business line at the family-owned operation that is still known as Barrett Hill Farm.

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Both businesses are owned and operated by Elmer and Holly Savage and their two sons, and while I haven’t had the opportunity to try any of their meat products, I have enjoyed two tasting room visits to sample a variety of their wines.  My first visit was on a chilly, early winter day complete with a dusting of snow, as my mom and I dashed in during a day trip that also included a stop at the nearby Morse’s Sauerkraut.

I found myself charmed by the farming roots of the business and by the sheer authenticity of the experience.  This is the type of winery you ought to find in Maine – and not in Napa.  The tasting room (although a new one is now under construction) was warm, with polished plank walls, and decorated with pieces of the farm’s history, such as an old yoke once used for oxen working the land.

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The wines were refreshingly authentic, too.  While the varietals may be unknown to many, I was familiar with the cold-hardy grapes they’d chosen to grow, many of which have been developed by the University of Minnesota.  These wine grapes are meant to grow in cold climates, like Maine, while still producing flavorful, appealing wines (so don’t mind the wine snobs who turn up their noses). Many of their wines have clever names, also tied to the farm’s rich heritage, such as General Knox (a white wine from LaCrosse grapes) and Come Spring (a light-bodied red wine that is a blend of estate grown Leon Millot, Marechal Foch, and St. Croix grapes).

I enjoyed both the Barn Red and Come Spring during our winter visit, and when we returned just last month with my husband (who I knew would appreciate the dual agricultural and viticultural focus), I was pleasantly surprised by how much enjoyed their white wines.  First Kiss, which is now sold out, was very good, as was Georges River.

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These wines are different – you need to allow your palate time to adjust, as they won’t (and shouldn’t) taste like the French varietals we are all so familiar with.  Once you learn to appreciate them, you may even find you prefer these wines and the way they complement various dishes.

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But all differences aside, Savage Oakes has done an excellent job of blending Maine tradition with new business opportunity, and they’ve created an atmosphere that is both welcoming for locals and unique for tourists.  I certainly recommend a visit and a tasting, and if you have the time, check out the final event in their Summer Concert series.  Cheers!


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Don’t Miss Out: Eat Drink Lucky

Today’s post is simply a brief recommendation to check out (and sign up) for Eat Drink Lucky, the Portland, Maine edition.  A few months ago, I discovered them on Twitter and signed up for their free, daily e-newsletter.  Given Portland’s status as a foodie city, it seemed like a wise way to stay in touch with Portland’s exciting culinary ventures when I’m far away.

(Unfortunately for me, reading about all of the great edible things happening 1,000+ miles away has only made me incredibly jealous of all of you lucky people who live in close proximity.)

Jealousy aside, I’ve enjoyed every edition.  The newsletter is cleverly written, brief, and regularly introduces me to, or reminds me of, fun cultural events and dining (or drinking) opportunities.

For example, I was inspired to post about them today specifically by their “Drink” section, which clued me into Rosemont Market’s three wine tastings this week (and next) that will be geared toward helping you select the perfect Thanksgiving pairing.

Happy wining and dining!


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Made in Maine: Blacksmiths Winery

Over the last decade, the popularity of wine has grown rapidly throughout the US.  A well-loved beverage throughout human history, wine does carry an intimidation factor – those who don’t know much about it have simply avoided it in the past – rather than being forced to discuss flavors of pear and citrus, or smoke and plums, with their wine-wise friends.  From my perspective, one of the benefits local wineries and vineyards offer to those formerly intimidated by the world of wine is an accessible, relaxed atmosphere in which to try it and learn about it.

Outside of Blacksmiths at dusk

Outside of Blacksmiths at dusk

Maine has not been immune to the wine fervor, with vineyards and wineries popping up around the state.  I hope to visit more of them in the future, but this post is all about Blacksmiths Winery and my experiences there at wine tastings.  It’s no secret that Nick and I enjoy a good glass of wine, and my mom actually introduced us to Blacksmiths on Nick’s first trip to Maine with me more than four years ago.  Nick knows much more about wine than I do, and he is the person who taught me most of what I know.

Our first venture into Blacksmiths was a great experience.  Located in South Casco, Maine, we headed there from my parents’ home on Sebago Lake to pick up some wine for Thanksgiving dinner (and of course, enjoy a tasting!).  The tasting room space is charming and rustic – the decor very fitting for a New England winery – and includes a gift shop space with wine-themed items for purchase.

Interior of Blacksmiths

Interior of Blacksmiths

From the colonial exterior to the comfortable, warm ambience inside, I enjoyed everything about my first, second, and ongoing experiences at Blacksmiths Winery.  This is a great spot to stop for a bachelorette party, girls’ (or guys’) night out, a family visit (they have soda for the under 21s), and more.

Their beverage list is quite extensive and has grown in recent years.  On my first visit, they offered soda and wine, but most recently, I saw that they are also offering hard ciders under the brand Fatty Bampkins.  So far, I’ve stuck with the wines, and primarily the French varietals at that, but I think next time I’ll give the ciders a whirl.  Of the wines I’ve tried, the Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon are my favorites.  They make a big, flavorful Cab, with a strong smoky taste – really perfect for a steak or roast.

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As ice wines go, I thought their Vidal Ice Wine was outstanding.  I prefer dry wines over sweet, but with this dessert wine, you don’t even need the dessert itself.  It’s that good!

Behind the bar..

Behind the bar..

I hope you’ll make time to visit Blacksmiths on your next visit to that part of Maine – I can assure you won’t regret it.  They also offer shipping to 19 states (see list here) and use vinoshipper.com.  They ship to NC, so I do see a purchase in my near future!

Blacksmiths Winery Contact Information & Address:

967 Quaker Ridge Road
P.O. Box 86
South Casco, ME 04077
207-655-3292


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Mark your calendars… for the Kennebunkport Festival 2013!

For many years, the Maine summer event at the forefront of my mind has been the Yarmouth Clam Festival (which will be July 19th – 21st this year). I loved going as a child, as a teen, and a young adult- but more on that to come.  Recently, Twitter activity (follow me @mainerootsgirl) about the Kennebunkport Festival has piqued my interest – so I did some digging.

The Kennebunkport Festival 2013 is June 4th-8th and is produced by the staff of Maine magazine and Maine Home+Design magazine.  Their intent, per the ‘About’ page, is to showcase the finest of Maine – fine art, fine dining, and fine wine.  Set in charming Kennebunkport, Maine, the festival includes dinners at private residences, special events hosted by restaurants and other venues, art viewings, and live music.  For a full listing of events or to purchase tickets, click here.

Dock Square in Kennebunkport, Maine

Dock Square in Kennebunkport, Maine

Where the Yarmouth Clam Festival has a casual, family-friendly vibe, the Kennebunkport Festival strikes me as an opportunity for adults to explore and enjoy the upscale side of Maine – I envision sundresses and cocktails, oceanside.   And oh, how I wish I could be there!


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Morse’s Sauerkraut

Morse’s Sauerkraut is a true Maine tradition.  Just ask David Swetnam and Jacquelyn Saywer, the owner / operators, who purchased Morse’s in the fall of 2000 – tumbling into bed after a cross-country move to Maine, waking on Day One to make saurkraut – and immediately thereafter being inundated with customers – some of whom had been buying their sauerkraut at Morse’s for more than 70 years.

Morse's sign

Morse’s sign

During my Christmas trip to Maine, I had the pleasure of meeting David and Jacquelyn in person, albeit briefly, as Morse’s was packed to the gills with customers at the time.  After their busy holiday season, David was kind enough to talk with me and share their story, which is the one I want to share with you today.

When I originally envisioned this post on Morse’s Sauerkraut, I expected to be writing about the establishment itself, the goods to be purchased there, and their famous sauerkraut.  Instead, while I will touch on these areas (after all, the post would be rather incomplete without them), the story I learned is one that goes to the core of why I started writing this blog; it’s a tale of two people falling back in love with the state of Maine – of feeling drawn to the place, to the people, and ultimately back to their roots.

Both David and Jacque have Maine roots –  Jacque is actually a descendant of Harriet Beecher Stowe – and the German side of David’s family had settled in and around Waldoboro, as many other German immigrants did.  Between 1742 and 1753, roughly 1,000 Germans settled in what was Broad Bay, Massachusetts at that time.  Today, it’s known as Waldoboro, Maine.  The agrarian lifestyle and terrain felt familiar to many of these immigrants, and German Americans can be credited with gifting us with popular American foods including hot dogs, hamburgers, and sauerkraut, in addition to other mainstream traditions including the Christmas tree.

Cheeses, meats, and other tasty treats

Cheeses, meats, and other tasty treats

Despite these deep roots, David and Jacque’s lives and careers as art dealers took them far from Maine and around the world – including time spent in Seattle, Santa Barbara, and even Peru, where they were introduced to a rare breed of dog – which they still keep and raise today.  In 1999, David returned to the East Coast to visit his father, who retired to Massachusetts.  While there, he decided to take a trip up to Maine and revisit some childhood haunts – a trip that would ultimately alter their course – he was so charmed by the state that he made an on-the-spot decision to find a way to move back. Luckily, Jacque was in agreement with him.

Having been entrepreneurs all their lives, he and Jacque began a search for the right business to purchase, and in what can only be described as a twist of fate, stumbled across an ad for Morse’s Sauerkraut.  Intrigued, David took a closer look at the business and called on his 95-year-old Aunt Hazel for a bit of insight.  Her resounding advice was, “Oh David, you have to buy it.  It’s famous all over for its sauerkraut, and your grandfather simply haunted it.”  And buy it they did.

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David and Jacque soon discovered how accurate his aunt’s assessment had been.  In keeping with tradition, they issued a very brief, very small advertisement in the local newspaper.  It read simply – ‘Kraut’s Ready.’  And just like that, customers descended.  Many were of German or other European descent, while others had simply adopted the Morse’s sauerkraut tradition as their own over the years.  Until better cold storage for cabbage was developed, the making of sauerkraut was a seasonal business, with Morse’s opening in October.  This meant immediate gratification for David and Jacque in their first fall as owners of Morse’s Sauerkraut.

As time has gone by, much has changed at this small business. For the first several years, they maintained the business much as it had always been – making and selling sauerkraut being the highlight, in addition to making pickles (Morse’s makes and sells over 100 tons of pickles and 100 tons of sauerkraut per year ).  The transition to being open year-round and selling a wider array of goods occurred very naturally.  First and most importantly, better cold storage for cabbage was developed, making it possible for David and Jacque to make Morse’s famous sauerkraut year-round.  On a side note, nearly all of the cabbage for their sauerkraut is grown on a local, commercial farm in Warren, Maine.  ‘Cabbage central,’ as David called it, is actually in upstate NY today.  With this ability to make and sell sauerkraut all year, other needs become more evident, and through a combination of special orders and initiative, David and Jacque began expanding their product offerings to the variety of goods they sell today- an eye-poppingly colorful display of pickles, relishes, mustards, vinegars, dried German recipe ingredients, German and European candies and cakes, sausages, cheeses, and more.

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While this variety has transformed Morse’s into an even greater resource for the community, their sauerkraut, made with Morse’s secret recipe, is still very much at the core.  Today, they ship to many customers by mail order, while still thousands more venture from all over the country to buy their sauerkraut at Morse’s – they have fans are as California and of course, throughout the Northeast.  In addition, Morse’s distributes their sauerkraut to over 150 stores and restaurants in Maine, while some business owners will drive up from Massachusetts and Connecticut to purchase it to sell in their establishments.

So, what makes Morse’s sauerkraut so special?  Cabbage is incredibly good for you – it is low carb, high fiber, and contains cancer-fighting 3-indole carbinol.  The fermentation process to create sauerkraut amplifies this impact, because the probiotics that drive fermentation support your digestive system, and in combination with the high fiber quality of this food, may even assist in weight loss efforts.  Fermentation also increases the bioavailability of the antioxidants found in cabbage (bioavailability means the availability of nutrients in a food for your body to absorb and use – for more on this topic check out the Bioavailability post on Ann Pierce’s blog).

Head of cabbage

Head of cabbage

However, most commercially sold sauerkraut has been pasteurized and taken out of its natural fermentation liquor, or brine, and then placed in a new brine filled with unhealthy preservatives.  So while flavor already set Morse’s apart, perhaps the most significant difference is that Morse’s sauerkraut has not been pasteurized, which maintains its flavor and texture as well as its healthfulness, and it is sold in its fermentation brine – which essentially means it continues to ferment – and the longer it does this, the more the bioavailability of those nutrients increases.

Vinegars, pickles, relishes, mustards, and more

Vinegars, pickles, relishes, mustards, and more

Over time, David has come to see Morse’s Sauerkraut as a living museum, and he and Jacque as merely the curators for the time being.  Many of their customers and their families have been buying their kraut at Morse’s for many decades – making it not only a very successful small business, but a special tradition.  He hopes, and believes, that the people of Maine, and those across the United States, will continue to return to Morse’s to buy their sauerkraut long after he and Jacque are gone.

I believe he’s right.  Morse’s Sauerkraut is a reflection of the state itself – having stood firm in its traditional operation as a farm stand since 1918, it is a proud and recognizable business that has been open to change while remaining true to its roots.

For more about the history of Morse’s, please visit this link for the history page on their website.  You might learn something unexpected – for example, Virgil Morse, Jr. constructed the current building himself from the ground up!

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3856 Washington Road
North Waldoboro, ME 04572

Phone: 207-832-5569

Email: morses@roadrunner.com


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Something Sweet: The Honey Exchange

At 494 Stevens Avenue in Portland, you will find a bright, inviting yellow house, now home to a business, that simply beckons you inside.  This bright, cheery store is The Honey Exchange, and it offers a wide range of products, including honey and honey bi-products as well as mead, wine, and all décor that is bee-related.  I was charmed the moment I walked through the entry and was welcomed by one of the owner / operators, Meghan Gaven.   She and her husband, Phil, are beekeepers who have turned this retail operation into a place where people of all ages can learn about honey, the bees that make it, watch these bees at work in their Observation Hive, and purchase honey and related goods.

The Honey Exchange

In addition to the storefront aspect of their work, Meghan and Phil, who recently received his Master Beekeeper Certificate, act as connectors and supporters of the local beekeeping community.  People who may not have the space to keep bees, but would like to have the opportunity, as well as those who perhaps have the space and even the hives, but not the desire or time to beekeep, both approach them and the Gavens work to connect these individuals.  They also provide a number of classes, taught in their back room, to educate new beekeepers and others about the care and significance of these special insects and the honey they create.

The Observation Hive!  It has a little outlet through the wall for the bees to venture into the great outdoors.

The Observation Hive! It has a little outlet through the wall for the bees to venture into the great outdoors.

Meghan was friendly, down-to-earth, and took the time to briefly chat with my mother, my sister, and me about their work in beekeeping, extracting honey, and assisting other beekeepers with the extraction process.  They named their establishment The Honey Exchange because it is, in a fundamental sense, an exchange.  They harvest their own honey as well as others, and in return, jar and market the honey, labeling each container with information about the origin of the honey and the bees that made it.  Meghan also spends part of her time educating children about bees and their work, and how critical they are to keeping our world blossoming (pun intended).

An assortment of honey to taste!  Check out all of the different colors - a result of the bees and what type of flower or plant they took nectar from!

An assortment of honey to taste! Check out all of the different colors – a result of the bees and what type of flower or plant they took nectar from!

Like most of you, I have appreciated honey for a long time – using it to sweeten coffee and tea, smearing it on toast with butter and cinnamon, and even mixing it with soy sauce to make a sweet sauce for beets.  In addition to being tasty and natural (a vast improvement over Splenda and other manmade sweeteners), one of the things I love about honey is its nutritional benefit; as a natural anti-inflammatory, honey is an excellent addition to the diet of a runner like me.  To learn more about honey and its nutritional benefits, check out this blog entry by Anne Pierce, a Master Nutritionist in Denver, CO.  Because this nutritional benefit is important to me, I feel compelled to share one of the more surprising things I learned from Meghan: she recommended that I look closely at the label when purchasing honey – because some products that are labeled “honey” may have very little honey – or absolutely no honey – in them at all!  Natural honey, particularly some types, tends to crystallize quickly – so some manufacturers use a very minimal amount of real honey in their “honey” products to prolong its syrupy texture and appearance.  My recommendation: buy your honey from a reputable, local source… like The Honey Exchange.

My first venture into The Honey Exchange took place during a Thanksgiving trip to Maine in 2011, shortly after they opened.  My mother has raved about it to me many times and she promised to take me in.  When I began this blog, I knew I wanted to feature The Honey Exchange (and places like it), so I returned during our Christmas trip to gain the additional information I needed.  The Honey Exchange is an excellent representation of a Maine entrepreneurial endeavor – its owners, Phil and Meghan Gaven, make their living as owners of this small business – a business that not only contributes to the economy, but also serves an important environmental need by promoting the beekeeping industry and educating people about bees, these unique insects that truly make our world go round.  A perfect example of the significance of bees in pollinating our world relates to the Maine blueberry industry – it takes 50,000 hives to pollinate Maine’s 60,000 plus acres of wild blueberries (because this number is so high, many hives actually have to be trucked in from out-of-state).  For more on the Maine blueberry, see my HoME Grown post here.

Assortment of wines and mead

Assortment of wines and mead

I highly recommend venturing in to see this wonderful store – you will have a chance to support the local economy and learn about the important role bees play in our day-to-day life.  It’s bigger than we realize, and we could all take a lesson from this approach to life – do something you are called to do, however simple or complex, work hard at it, and prosperity will follow.

Learn more about The Honey Exchange online at thehoneyexchange.com or reach them by phone at 207.773.9333.

A very cute bee!

A very cute bee!